Fleet World Workshop Tools
Car Tax Calculator
CO2 Calculator
Car Comparator
Van Tax Calculator
EV Car Comparator
BiK Rates Company Car Tax

The Mayor and TfL consult on Ultra Low Emission Zone

By / 6 years ago / Latest News / No Comments

The proposals would require all vehicles travelling within the Congestion Charge zone to meet new emission standards and would be in operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Many vehicles would already meet these standards in 2020, however by introducing this requirement next year the Mayor and TfL aim to accelerate the take up of low emission vehicles and stimulate the low emission vehicle market.

The ULEZ is projected to halve emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM10) from vehicle exhausts.  This means more than 80% of central London is expected to meet the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) annual legal limits in 2020.

According to TfL, the ULEZ would also lead to a significant reduction in the number of people living in areas of poor air quality (where levels of NO2 exceed legal limits) – by 74% in central London, 51% in inner London and 43% in outer London. In high concentrations NO2 can cause breathing problems and increase asthma symptoms, with research suggesting that children and young people are most adversely affected.

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, commented: 'Introducing the world's first Ultra Low Emission Zone is an essential measure to improve London's air quality and reduce NO2 . Safeguarding Londoners' health and well-being is a top priority for my administration. I understand that people need adequate time to switch to greener vehicles and help is at hand for those who will be hardest hit, but let's be clear, we need to make these important changes ASAP to continue to improve Londoners' quality of life and give everyone who lives in or visits the city the cleanest possible air to breathe.'

The ULEZ proposals would require vehicles travelling in central London to meet the following emissions standards, or pay a daily charge:   ·        

  • Cars and small vans – Euro 6 for diesel engines (registered from 1 September 2015 so five years old or less in 2020) and Euro 4 for petrol engines (registered from 1 January 2006 so 14 years old or less in 2020). Non-compliant vehicles could still drive in the zone but they would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50
  • Large vans and minibuses – Euro 6 for diesel engines (registered from 1 September 2016 so four years old or less in 2020) and Euro 4 for petrol engines (registered from 1 January 2007 so 13 years old or less in 2020). Non-compliant vehicles would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50
  • Heavy goods vehicles, buses and coaches – Euro 6 (registered from 1 January 2014 so six years old or less in 2020). Non- compliant vehicles would be required to pay a daily charge of £100        
  • Motorcycles and similar vehicles – Euro 3 (registered from 1 July 2007 so 13 years old or less in 2020).  Non-compliant vehicles would be required to pay a daily charge of £12.50.  

As part of the ULEZ proposal, TfL is also working to reduce emissions from its buses alongside taxis and private hire vehicles and to increase the number of zero emission capable vehicles. 

From 2018, it is proposed there will be a new requirement for all taxis and new private hire vehicles presented for licensing in the capital for the first time to be zero emission capable.  Private hire vehicles would also be subject to the ULEZ standards in central London just like other cars and vans (and therefore liable for the charge if they don't meet the emissions standards).

The ULEZ consultation, which runs from today until Friday 9 January 2015, is available online at: https://consultations.tfl.gov.uk/environment/ultra-low-emission-zone

For more of the latest industry news, click here.

Katie Beck

Katie joined Fleet World in 2012 as an editorial intern, following the completion of an English and American Literature BA from the University of East Anglia. She accepted a full-time position as an editorial assistant at the end of the internship period, and was promoted to the role of features editor in 2014. She works across the magazine and website portfolio, and administrates the social media channels.